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Unable to play and keep time(e.g. count, stay on beat) at the same time. Please help!


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#1 run26point2

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 12:42 AM

Steve, I am unable to play rhythm or solos for a song when playing a song or exercise and keep time simultaneously.  In short, I can't seem to be able to play and keep time with either foot tapping or using a metronome; I can't count and play at the same time without messing up or getting lost.  Any suggestions or help you can give me that would help?



#2 quilter1958

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 02:14 AM

Take it one measure at a time. Just play one measure. Get that down. Play the second measure. Get that down. Soon, you will be playing the entire song. You've got to break it down as small as you have to and as slow as you have to until you get it. And, you will get it. I promise.

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#3 naccoachbob

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 02:24 AM

Maybe take a piece that you have down perfectly, something you could play in your sleep so to speak.

Then put it to a metronome slowly, and work up your speed.

Trying to play with a metronome when you don't know the piece can be a disaster. It can be done, but the first step is having the thing locked in to where you can play it reasonably well.

Then, as Sherry said, do it one or two bars at a time. Another step, after getting it to one bar is to play the bar and one or two notes of the second bar. It's easy to learn a bar, then the next bar, but get yourself in a situation where you sound too rigid. Adding another note or two, then learning that complete bar and one or two notes of the third, will make things go more fluidly.


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#4 run26point2

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 04:34 PM

Guys & girls, thanks for your input and help.  I'll implement these ideas and hopefully improve with time-keeping skills.

 

-John Y.



#5 RFH

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 10:29 PM

Another thing to try is to mute all the strings and strum and count. Start slow and work up to tempo.
When you get this down return to a slow speed and play the chords

Works well for me. I often use this method to "get" a song or pattern that is new to me
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#6 schroeder

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Posted 25 April 2016 - 03:47 PM

I still use my metronome but bought Digitech Trio + pedal. I can't say how well it works for other things, but I can play in time to it. I personally struggled with the nome and I think Beat Buddy or some type of Band in a box pedal will turn the internal timing switch on.

 

Some people actually have timing, others do not. My wife does, her brother does, but not me.

Playing with others or with simple music really helps. 

 

The pedal was Expensive but effective, made warm ups, scales, strumming exercises fun.  


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#7 JWELLS

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 11:50 AM

The gnome is the ultimate multitasking device ever invented by Satan and is also the ultimate distraction in learning to play. Tried twice to overcome this familiar problem and ended with success on both counts (Pardon the pun). First success was to buy a Peterson BodyBeat metronome, which has a pulsing transducer to place in your sock or belt, so you feel the beat in addition to hearing it (and you can also silence the sound). This worked well and was similar to some of the Peterson devices that vibrate the stage to keep the bpm beat for bands and orchestras. My second success was to avoid the distraction of the nasty little gnome by setting the beat before I start playing and get my foot tapping to it and once my foot is in sync I silence the darn thing. The more we  practice, the better we become at maintaining a beat. As the song says, "It don't mean a thing if you ain't got that swing--do wop, do wop, do wop wop!" As usual, master the Three P's--Practice, Perseverance, and Patience. This will work, but it takes time (Pardon another pun). Lotsa luck.


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#8 Paully

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 11:52 AM

I wanted a Trio when it first came out, but couldn't swing the coin. With the introduction of the Trio+ and the bottom of the market making the original Trio so affordable I was able to get an original Trio for like half price in new condition.
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#9 JWELLS

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 11:48 AM

Y'know, sometimes we need to step back and think about what we're trying to accomplish as we try to make music. It's times like these when I listen to what is probably the best foot-tapping musical recording I've ever heard. Louis Armstrong's "West End Blues" recorded way back in 1925 (before my time, even). Listen to it and just enjoy, and then utter a great big YeaH! Believe me, it helps. Lotsa luck.


Dreams alone won't go very far; Perfect practice will make you a star.

#10 tjmeyers

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 04:41 PM

Consider your strumming hand connected to your foot. When your foot goes down, you strumming hand goes down. When your foot comes up, your strumming hand comes up.

 

Also consider writing the beat count of each note and the strumming direction on the music.

 

Before you play a piece, leave your guitar alone. Tap your foot at the tempo required and tap your hand and say the beat count for each note. Once you've internalized the rhythm pick up your guitar and start slow.

 

I also have to agree that you have to go slow to go fast. Start slow in small chunks. As you master that chunk and speed, increase them.


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#11 schroeder

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 06:45 PM

Playing last night with the trio+. I saw they updated the firmware on the original trio to calm down the bass and something else. Anyways I am finally getting some good music with it. Took a while to figure out how to make it do what I wanted it to do. But I really think it has made my timing so much better. 

I get it going, palm mute a strum pattern till I find one that matches, then rip thru some chords. Great practice without the headache.


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