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built in flash

automatic mode question

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#1 ihavegills

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 09:33 AM

I am just wanting to go out with my camera in the automatic mode (the green thing atop the wheel) and take photos. In the automatic shooting the flash seems to come on a little oversensitive to me. Is this built in and nothing to do about it or can I or should I change the settings on the flash? It seems fine outside but in the house too dark, even with the lights on.



#2 NeilES335

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 09:33 PM

not sure what camera you have (i'm a newby to digital slr) but om my Nikon D3200 there is a built in flash which pops up automatically with the light sensor especially in auto mode. You can defeat the auto flash if you want in the settings menu. The built in flash is really only good for about 7-10 ft. Beyond that you need (or should) get a separate flash that attaches to the top of the camera on the slots called "hot shoe' . There's no wires or anything..it senses the flash is there and works whenever a flash is needed (it defeats the built in flash) or when you choose in the menu. They are expensive imho.. the one for my NIkon costs more than the camera ($550 CDN) but the photo guys says it's well worth it.. I've just made do so far and by using photoshop I brighten up the shots as needed.


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#3 Matonanjin

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 05:17 PM

ihavegills, you didn't mention what camera you are using.  But, as Neil stated, there should be a menu setting that will disable your camera from using the pop-up flash automatically.  Nothing screams amateur like use of the ugly, direct harsh flash built-into your camera.  In fact, there are entire courses and industries dedicated to the concept of "Off Camera Flash" (OCF). 

Beyond that you need (or should) get a separate flash that attaches to the top of the camera on the slots called "hot shoe' . There's no wires or anything..it senses the flash is there and works whenever a flash is needed (it defeats the built in flash) or when you choose in the menu. They are expensive imho.. the one for my NIkon costs more than the camera ($550 CDN) but the photo guys says it's well worth it.. I've just made do so far and by using photoshop I brighten up the shots as needed.

 

Neil, one of the fastest, easiest, dramatic ways to improve the quality of one's photos is to use that separate flash.  Dedicated flash systems from Canon and Nikon are obscenely expensive, you are correct.  I have 5 or 6 Canon dedicated flashes.  But there are cheaper alternatives.  If you go to that Strobist website in my link above they talk a lot inexpensive flash systems and inexpensive "clones".  And the fastest way to improve images is just bounce your flash off a ceiling.  Get a cheap flash that will swivel and bounce and bounce the light off the ceiling and you have 1000% improved photos with more natural looking light.   This is the LumoPro LP180 that Strobist recommends. $150.    I had a handful of Quantaray flashes that are probably laying around here somewhere yet that I used a lot decades ago when I made the switch to digital.  As you can see, you can buy them all day long on Flea Bay for $20-30.  Or go to your local pawn shop and check out the guitar inventory!  Then pick up a cheap manual flash that will pivot and bounce and start studying Strobist! 


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#4 NeilES335

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 12:03 AM

Matonanjin; Thanks a lot for the tips! It was that heavy price tag that held me back but the price of those units is easier to swallow. N

Happy Tunes...Neil E. :acoustic: 

 

Student of the Month July 2014

My Courses; LMG Session 11, (in progress... I really must finish this one day)

Speed and Agility Workout, (completed; but really it's become a warm up)

Major Scale Mastery I (complete)

Jazz courses (1,2,3 Jazz, Beyond Beginner Jazz, Jazz Learning Path 1,2,3) 

My Gear;

Gibson Memphis ES335 Dot Heritage Cherry (2011)

Godin 5th Ave. Kingpin Archtop P90 (2012)

Ovation Balladeer Acoustic (1968 1st Edition)

Fender GDEC 30 Amp Blues Edition

Vox AmPhones 

Ditto X2 Looper

 





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