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Session 16

Passing Chords

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#1 jetaime0424

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:26 AM

Hi Will,

 

How do I know when to use passing chords? Is there a rule?

 

Thanks,

 

Jina



#2 Mystery

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 06:25 AM

Hello Jina,

 


Hi Will,

 

How do I know when to use passing chords? Is there a rule?

 

Thanks,

 

Jina

 

It's obvious that I'm not Will Barrow, but here is some information and a suggestion for you to consider.

 

Passing chords are used to enhance chord progressions that would otherwise sound less interesting or perhaps lack "drive" as a consequence of playing the same chord several times in succession.  As shown in the notation for the second version of "Home to You" in Session 16, in each of three measures Will uses passing chords to break up the monotony of playing four identical chords in succession.  He could have also used a passing chord in the fifth measure where the D chord (actually a D/A chord written on the treble staff) is repeated four times.

 

There are a few possible choices for using a passing chord in that fifth measure, but I would not use the same G/D chord that Will used in the first measure of the piece.

 

For example, either the second or the third D/A chord in the fifth measure could be replaced with a Dbdim7/Bb chord (the notes for which are: Bb, Db, E & G --- specifically Bb[3], Db[4], E[4] & G[4], using scientific note identifiers where middle-C is represented as C[4]).  Such a substitution introduces a little unusual, interest-stimulating dissonance into the piece and (when the third D/A chord is replaced with the Dbdim7/Bb chord) shows that the passing chord need not be in the same relative location within similar measures of the piece.  Try it --- you may (or may not) like it!

 

Don't hesitate to post additional related questions to this topic thread.

 

Suggestion: Type "passing chord" (including the quotation marks) into the entry box of a search engine such as Google or Bing and when the search is completed you will be presented with a significant amount of information that should help answer the questions you posted.

 

Make mellifluous music!

 

Mystery



#3 jetaime0424

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 07:45 PM

Thank you Mr. Mystery. 







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