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Session 11 - Let It Be Interlude Question


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#1 muskokaclassic

muskokaclassic

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 11:11 PM

I'm having trouble with the c and c base note.  My hands don't stretch that far without hitting other keys.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Sue

 



#2 Mystery

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 07:41 AM

Hello Sue, a.k.a. "The Baron,"

 



I'm having trouble with the c and c base note.  My hands don't stretch that far without hitting other keys.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Sue

 

It should be obvious that I'm NOT Will Barrow.  Nonetheless, I offer you the following information which may prove helpful to you.

 

The trouble you stated experiencing is in the "Interlude" section [which is NOT truly an "interlude" section] of the piece "Let It Be" in Session 11 of the L&M Piano Lesson book.  It seems that your left hand may not currently be able to span from the C[2] note to be played with left LH finger 5 and the C[3] note to be played LH finger 1.  If I have correctly understood your problem, then as temporary workarounds while you give your hand span and finger dexterity time to develop through the use of appropriate exercises and practice, persistence and patience, here are two suggestions for your consideration:

 

1) For each octave interval consisting of C[2] & C[3], play a perfect fifth interval (often referred to as a two-note "power chord") C[2] & G[2], using LH fingers 5 & 1; or,

 

2) For each octave interval consisting of C[2] & C[3], "break-up"/"roll" that interval by first playing the C[2] note with LH finger 5, then lift that finger from the note and quickly move the LH slightly to the right so that the C[3] note can easily be played using LH finger 1.  If you also press the sustain pedal while playing those broken/rolled intervals, the overall sound of the piece will be enhanced.

 

Make mellifluous music!

 

Mystery

 

P.S.: In North America (and some other regions), the scientific identifier for the note middle-C is C[4].  (Unfortunately, in Japan and some other countries, middle-C is identified as C[3].)  For example, in NA the scientific note identifiers for two full octaves of the C-major scale with middle-C at the centre would be C[3], D[3], E[3], F[3], G[3], A[3], B[3], C[4], D[4], E[4], F[4], G[4], A[4], B[4] & C[5].






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