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Session 12 Question


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#1 scratcher

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:02 AM

In the lessons Will often doesn't lift the finger off the key of the preceeding note when he plays the next note in the triplet of the arpeggiated chord. It sounds good so that's fine, but my question is ...if you are playing the music as it is written, should the finger be lifted or is there some convention that you can sustain those notes as the the chord is built in an ascending or descending fashion. The reason I ask is that I may take some one on one tuition in the future and would want to know how a classically trained instructor would regard the notation if I was playing pieces for her (or him)

#2 Mystery

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 03:24 AM

Hello "scratcher,"

In the lessons Will often doesn't lift the finger off the key of the preceeding note when he plays the next note in the triplet of the arpeggiated chord. It sounds good so that's fine, but my question is ...if you are playing the music as it is written, should the finger be lifted or is there some convention that you can sustain those notes as the the chord is built in an ascending or descending fashion. The reason I ask is that I may take some one on one tuition in the future and would want to know how a classically trained instructor would regard the notation if I was playing pieces for her (or him)

When playing a real acoustic piano or a good digital piano with graded-weight, hammer-action keys, a player need only allow a struck key/note to rise slightly (about a quarter of the maximum vertical key movement) to automatically reduce the ringing/sustain the struck key/note has relative to the sustain that note would have if it was held down completely. That partial release has the same effect as completely lifting the playing finger off the struck key/note. Whether or not that partial release of a struck key/note is appropriate depends on the context of the music being played (i.e. what is specified in the notation). Within triplets, for example, there can exist accented note(s), staccato'd note(s), slurred notes, tied notes, rest(s), etc. Any such notation will require the affected note(s) to be played differently than note(s) without such markings. Of course, the piano pedals (soft, sostenuto & sustain/damper pedals) can also be used as required or specified to alter the sound produced when playing any note(s).

When playing the notes in a triplet, it is essential to play each note (and any included rest(s)) in strict accord with the assigned tempo and meter (time signature) and according to the note markings.

I hope this information proves to be helpful to you. Please don't hesitate to post additional questions regarding this topic if you would like additional information.

Make mellifluous music!

Mystery





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