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Trying To Play With Both Hands= Frustration!


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#1 Mike64

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 03:02 AM

Im currently on session 4 where you add the bass line to "When the saints go marching in". I have the bass line down but when i try to play both the bass line and melody im completely lost.I can do the first two phrases of the song with both hands but when its the third phrase "Oh when the saints go march-in in"..i lose it Its frustrating because i feel as if its impossible to do but its obvious it can be done. Is it too early in the lessons to expect to be able to play comfortably with both hands at this time? any help would be greatly appreciated.

#2 Kent

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 04:50 AM

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#3 sjr2k

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 06:00 AM

My course came with the old edition handbook, and it says
"play bass line with the left hand while the right hand rests"
I did try to play both hands together but could not do it back then.

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#4 MGDelvo

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 08:10 AM

I started the course about a year ago - completely new to piano at that stage. The LH/RH co-ordination has been (& to some extent still is) the most frustrating aspect of learning BUT give it time - you will get there... Break the pieces down into phrases, get the hands working together on each phrase & then start putting the phrases together. Will doesn't expect the two hands to be working together at this stage - move forward when you have both hands working independently - the coordination will come as you go through the course. Mike

#5 Yusuf105

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 01:53 PM

Hi Mike and welcome,
First. You are NOT expected to play this piece with both hands at this early stage.
The music in the workbook just shows an example of how a bass line might look.
Second. Theres no harm in trying it out, but for a beginner, it is quite difficult.
I tried this piece and looked at it as a challenge. It seemed impossible at first then, suddenly, there was a break through. This happens quite frequently during the course but it doesn't bother me so much now when I get to a difficult bit.I just go through the practice procedure and it comes eventually.
If you DO want to play it, make sure you can play the melody line and the bass line separately in a smooth manner and use the backing CD to practice with.
Once you've got that under your belt,very slowly (40 bpm) play the first phrase, or first two bars, with both hands until you can play it smoothly.Then go to the next phrase and do the same.
Do this until you've gone through the whole piece.REMEMBER. Play it slowly.Your muscles and brain WILL gradually remember what to do. DON'T rush.
DON't hammer away at it for long periods. Practice it for ten minutes or so then take a break.Go on with the course then come back to it every now and then.
Don't worry if you cant do it yet. It will come as you go through the course.
These things do take time and you can't rush it You've got to give your brain and muscles time to take it all in.Slow repetition is the key.Practice, practice, practice with frequent breaks.
When you learnt to walk.When you learnt to feed yourself. When you learnt to catch a ball.When you learnt your alphabet. All this was done through constant repetition until it became automatic.Playing the piano is no different.
I understand your frustrations. We've all been there.
Try not to get too frustrated. It tenses you up and makes learning more difficult.Concentrate on relaxing and having fun.
I wish you every success and I hope we can help with any future difficulties.
Kind regards,
YUSUF
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#6 Mike64

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 05:27 PM

Thank you everyone for the words of encouragement......Now, i won't feel as if I can't be sucessful because I can't get this part down. Be patient, be patient, be patient...i tell myself. But when you see how effortlessly and beautifully some people play, you want to hurry the process and are quick to lose sight of how long it takes to be that good. thanks again...

#7 magnus80a

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 09:15 PM

I'm right there with you. I didn't realize I wasn't suppose to be able to use both hands at the same time at this point. Now I feel a lot better. :-)

#8 Geoff99

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 06:12 PM

I did the same thing! But then I noticed that the lesson did say do them separately. I got them down separately but I was determined to play them together. Still working on that. :whistling:
I have continued on to the next lessons but each day I practice both hands together. I have part of it sounding pretty good.

#9 Uncle Red

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 04:41 PM

Im currently on session 4 where you add the bass line to "When the saints go marching in". I have the bass line down but when i try to play both the bass line and melody im completely lost.I can do the first two phrases of the song with both hands but when its the third phrase "Oh when the saints go march-in in"..i lose it Its frustrating because i feel as if its impossible to do but its obvious it can be done. Is it too early in the lessons to expect to be able to play comfortably with both hands at this time? any help would be greatly appreciated.

I'm at the same place. What I did was to take the third measure and isolate and slowed it way down in my mind and concentrating on each finger movement sometimes just the three or four notes that I was having the problem with until I began to get right finger action put together. I was able to work my way through it in a couple of days so that I could play through it without thinking about it. I was acutally surprised when I got it. It sort of just clicked all at once. Then I moved on to the next one and began working on it.

#10 krystalblue

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 07:37 PM

I can certainly appreciate what you're talking about. It's one of the reasons why I purchased this course. I checked out private lessons, but finding the time and cash for them was difficult. I had minor success with some how to books, but they did not prepare me for the LH/RH thing at all. The pieces I had learned with both hands were only after many, many hours of practice. It is certainly a challenge, but a very fun one indeed. I just can't believe how much fun this is and I am learning not curse every time I hit a wrong key or my left hand does it's own thing. The play along CD's really make me feel like I am making music. Thanks Will.

Im currently on session 4 where you add the bass line to "When the saints go marching in". I have the bass line down but when i try to play both the bass line and melody im completely lost.I can do the first two phrases of the song with both hands but when its the third phrase "Oh when the saints go march-in in"..i lose it Its frustrating because i feel as if its impossible to do but its obvious it can be done. Is it too early in the lessons to expect to be able to play comfortably with both hands at this time? any help would be greatly appreciated.



#11 Unclickable

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 01:14 AM

I was at the exact same place that you were awhile ago when i first began. I have to tell you that I felt the same way that you felt. I am sure that you have passed this barrier by now but for anyone else that is going through the same thing, trust me practice it enough and you will get it done. Good luck!

#12 Qi Chi

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 08:58 AM

Im currently on session 4 where you add the bass line to "When the saints go marching in". I have the bass line down but when i try to play both the bass line and melody im completely lost.I can do the first two phrases of the song with both hands but when its the third phrase "Oh when the saints go march-in in"..i lose it Its frustrating because i feel as if its impossible to do but its obvious it can be done. Is it too early in the lessons to expect to be able to play comfortably with both hands at this time? any help would be greatly appreciated.

I'm at the same place. What I did was to take the third measure and isolate and slowed it way down in my mind and concentrating on each finger movement sometimes just the three or four notes that I was having the problem with until I began to get right finger action put together. I was able to work my way through it in a couple of days so that I could play through it without thinking about it. I was acutally surprised when I got it. It sort of just clicked all at once. Then I moved on to the next one and began working on it.

I would imagine the OP has mastered this now but for new students who are at this point, it is an interesting discussion because I think it is a bit of a turning point?

At this point in the lessons it did not ask for us to be able to play with both hands together but we would all like to I know that we can do it. I bet Uncle Red's experience is probably common to many of us -- eventually it just clicks into place?

All I can say is patience and practice takes care of it eventually. I find that practicing really slowly with the left hand only then the right hand only, then put them both together and play really slowly. If its still a struggle, don't try and force it but eventually with practice it will come.

That is true for this piece at least in my experience and overall I am more or less getting there (I can do all the later lessons and am about half way through the course) I just hope that when it is harder pieces it works out the same. :pianodancer: I wanted to ask Will for the best ways to practice this technique in another thread so if anyone has any other tips for how to master the techniques for hand independence please share them?

#13 GardDawg

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 02:31 AM




I heard somewhere that a concert pianist requires ten thousand hours of practice to become proficient ...

my wife said it must have taken me forty hours to learn "Louie Louie" ... now only 9,960 hours to go

#14 Yusuf105

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 12:02 PM

Well done GardDawg,my man.
Only 59.29 weeks to go then. (If you practice 24/7) Ha ha.
YUSUF
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#15 chuckaltair

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:41 AM

Hey GuarDawg,

Thanks for sharing. It helps watching fellow students do their thing. Keeps me on my toes and enjoying the process of learning the piano. Glad you are doing so well. Time is really of little relevance as long as you enjoy the process.

Best wishes and keep making music.

Chuck... :pianodancer:

#16 MarthaT

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 02:02 PM

Sounds good!
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#17 greenmatter

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Posted 10 August 2011 - 09:26 PM

Thanks for sharing
Don't Worry Be Happy!Posted Image:)

#18 Richard/Dallas

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Posted 16 September 2011 - 06:34 PM

A visitor to New York City asked a passerby for directions to Carnegie Hall. The answer he got was, “Practice, practice, practice”.

What I did when I first started was to put my right thumb on middle C and my left little finger on the C below middle C. I then played both Cs together, then both Ds together and so forth. It took a while to get it right but I did learn that it was possible for me to play both hands at the same time.

It’s better to practice a little each day then a practice a lot one day and then take the rest of the week off. I try to practice four days a week; Sunday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. I keep track of the days I practice on a calendar on the wall next to my Clavinova.

Just remember that if playing the piano was easy, everyone would be doing it.

#19 ravindra

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 03:57 AM

Yes it is too early to work on hand coordination at the session 4. You may get back to coordinating between hands especially in sessions 17 and more in session 18 with Blue licks. But if you can get it down at this stage it is an added advantage and the future lessons will be more easier and takes less time. That's what I experienced at session 18. So at this stage it will take more time to get this thing down. But still that time and effort is an investment for your future success. I'll suggest you following instructions to get this thing down.

 

First play the right-hand melody slowly till you become proficient at it. Then play only the bass figure in time with the beat. Once you master both of them in isolation, then slowly try to put them together. Make sure to  relax your hands and whole body when you play at the instrument. Don't make unnecessary stress which will tighten up your hands. Be relax and take your time. It will come to you after some time of continuous practice.

 

If you still find it hard, first try to play left hand in whole notes, moving gradually on to half notes, quarters and eighth notes. Then try to combine them gradually. Play it slowly as you need to at first and increase the tempo later. It took around 1.5 weeks for me to play this with both left and right hands in place simultaneously.

 

 

Thanks & Regards,

Ravindra.






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