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Guitar piano vocals sheet music


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#1 Jack T

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 07:10 PM

Which staff is the guitar part? There two treble clef staffs and one bass. There are also guitar chords above certain areas. If that is just the guitar part how does one tell how many times to strum or what the pattern is? :ermm:

#2 naccoachbob

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 05:51 PM

What are you referring to? I'm lost with the question.

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#3 Jack T

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 06:32 PM

There is a treble stave at the top then the full treble and bass staves like you see in piano music. Then sporadically throughout the piece there guitar chords. I know that guitar only plays in the treble stave but not sure which one? Also the guitars chords don't indicate how many times you would strum them or any strum pattern. I'm kinda lost looking at the piece as its for piano, guitar and vocals.

#4 naccoachbob

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 08:18 PM

Without seeing it, I can only guess that the one that has the chords written above it is probably the guitar one. As far as strumming, again guessing, wouldn't that probably run the same as the time the song is in, as 3/4 or 4/4. Can you take a picture of the piece your speaking about and post it?
Also, straight strumming of once every beat could get motonous, so I vary my strumming depending on the song - not a good answer, but it's all I got, lol.
Really, a picture or something might help.

Play well,

Bob
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#5 GlennZ

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 09:01 PM

Which staff is the guitar part? There two treble clef staffs and one bass. There are also guitar chords above certain areas. If that is just the guitar part how does one tell how many times to strum or what the pattern is? :ermm:

The top treble staff is for the vocalist and is generally the melody line. The second treble staff and the bass staff are for the piano accompaniment. The chord markings are where the chord changes occur.

As for strumming patterns, work it out for yourself. This is music, it is not all cut and dried. This is one area where personnel interpretation comes in to play.
Glenn Zumwalt

#6 Jack T

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 02:04 AM

Frustrated and I apologize.

#7 Jack T

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 02:15 AM

Frustrated and I apologize.

#8 Jack T

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 02:47 AM

Without seeing it, I can only guess that the one that has the chords written above it is probably the guitar one. As far as strumming, again guessing, wouldn't that probably run the same as the time the song is in, as 3/4 or 4/4. Can you take a picture of the piece your speaking about and post it?
Also, straight strumming of once every beat could get motonous, so I vary my strumming depending on the song - not a good answer, but it's all I got, lol.
Really, a picture or something might help.



Thank you Bob for actually trying to help me with this. Here is the first page of the music I purchased of the song I am trying to learn for my son. Any help you can give me on this would be greatly appreciated!

Attached Files

  • Attached File  song.pdf   85.78KB   124 downloads


#9 paparoe

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 09:08 AM

http://www.ehow.com/...heet-music.html
"If you can get them once, man, get them standing up when they should be sitting down, sweaty when they should be decorous, smile when they should be applauding politely-and I think you sort of switch on their brain, man, so that makes them say: 'Wait a minute, maybe I can do anything.' Whoooooo! It's life. That's what rock and roll is for, turn that switch on, and man, it can all be."

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#10 JWELLS6407

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 12:53 PM

Sorry ‘bout your frustration, Jack, but commercial sheet music is published in various scores, the most popular in modern times is the vocal score (often called the vocal-piano score). The topmost treble staff is the vocal staff and includes the melody (with lyrics) while the bottom two staffs (staves?) is chording, which is played by a pianist. A guitarist plays the melody, and so the vocal staff usually includes chord progressions and sometimes (and in your Disney case) even chord charts. The answer to your question is for you to use the vocal staff and ignore the bottom two.

Now, young man, I do feel like taking you MILDLY to task for disrespecting Steve’s L&MG course, which has made lotsa guitarists outta us wannbe’s. The course doesn’t claim to make “music majors” of us, just guitarists (and maybe the word “Master” in the title is stretching it a bit, although it’s good marketing). Please calm down and exercise a little judgment in your frustration. In other words, sir, put a “filter” on it! If you don’t lower your blood pressure, you’re in peril of not joining my cadre of octogenarians. Regardless, we’re all here to help and offer advice, answers, and encouragement. I’m no music major, but we do have them in abundance on our FORUM. Lotsa luck—and please take this mild admonition in the spirit in which I offer it.
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#11 Pierre340

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 12:58 PM

You better lsiten to him , you can learn a lot from him :budumching:

#12 Deogee

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 01:11 PM

I'm going to take this one step,further. I've paid good money for lessons privately and was told I was sh*t by the instructor. I grabbed this course as soon as I saw it but this is the same kind of hostility towards newbies like me that just makes me want to puke and scream "money back"! Please! I don't know how to read the piece of music I was looking at and thanks to people like GlennZ I never will. Hey Steve, this isn't cool, this forum should be way more about helping than making me feel stupid and still not answering my question!


Sorry to hear you feel that way about our forum ( & yes, Steve monitors it, Legacy puts up the money to maintain it, but we students make it what it is-- until Steve steps in to settle any riled up waters, if you will).

Actually GlennZ gave you a pretty good answer, considering he ( & the rest of us) are giving advice on a piece of music that we haven't seen.
Now that you've taken the time to show us the music, GlennZ is spot on with his *guess* .

The top line is the melody line, ( single guitar notes if you want to play only that,)
Above that staff are the chords, should you choose to play only the rythmn part. Strumming pattern? ....well, I've never heard the recording of the song, so I personally would start out with just a basic one strum per beat, just to get a feel for the chord changes, as well as the flow of the song.

From the basic *four on the floor* (AKA JWells) strumming pattern, I'd work with the melody line for a bit more style.
Knowing that the song is in 4/4 time, I would probably move to D-DU-D-DU ( seein's the first line's single notes are a quarter- sixteenth/ sixteenth,eighth- quarter- eighth,eighth) Technically, that second DU should be a sixteenth strum, but I can't pull that off (yet) so I'd stay with the eighth strum.
Which is what GlennZ was ( I believe), intimating, saying that its not cut & dried: its a personal expression ( within the *confines* of the time signature of course-- a 3/4 strum pattern wouldn't work, naturally)
If nothing else, with the internet, did you try searching YouTube (or google) for the song and a strumming pattern?

From the time signature, you'll also notice you're in the key of G, meaning all your F's are sharp ( unless they've been *naturalized* out, by a natural sign)
That would be ALL the F's, not just the F on the high (1st string) E string.

.... same kind of hostility towards newbies like me.....


You don't say what session you're on Jack, & it doesn't matter I suppose, but your join date for the forum is 2009, so I'm thinking "newbie"?-- 3 yrs. after joining the forum? People take breaks, life gets too busy for guitar, I suppose; you get lost playing music, instead of furthering your lessons. but to come on here, asking for help from people who are taking time away from their personal lives ( practicing guitar, life chores, life fun, etc) & then getting in a snit because a person gives you an answer that is short & maybe something you don't fully understand. Well to use your own words:

isn't cool


I personally don't see where anyone giving you an answer talked down to you, making you feel stupid, maybe that feeling is an *inside job* & has nothing to do with Glenn's answer.

Now you can feel free to bash on me for being * insensitive*.
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#13 Jack T

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 02:52 PM

I did research this online and couldn't find the answers I was looking for. My son wants me to learn this song and my frustration level of not knowing which stave to follow was getting to me. I have learned a great deal in these forums from all the wonderful people in here. I am currently in session 5 as I struggled with session 4 for quite a long time. Being told by an instructor years ago that I sucked and should think about giving it up really stuck with me. I sincerely apologize to GlennZ and my remarks about L&M. Incidentally my playing is quite a bit better than that instructor from years ago would have ever given me credit for; I owe that to this course and forum.

#14 JWELLS6407

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 04:49 PM

Forget it, Jack; we've all been there. "Guitar, thy name is frustration!" Hey, if my teacher had told me I played like s++t (and I probably did)I'd have probably given him the chance to knock it outta me. We luv you and your son, too. Lotsa luck with the song.
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#15 naccoachbob

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 05:55 PM

JWELLS gave you the right info for this song. And paparoe had a good link in his post. The melody might be pretty easy to play. Good luck with it.

Play well,

Bob
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#16 GlennZ

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 07:07 PM

Actually GlennZ gave you a pretty good answer, considering he ( & the rest of us) are giving advice on a piece of music that we haven't seen.
Now that you've taken the time to show us the music, GlennZ is spot on with his *guess* .

Actually, it wasn't a guess.

If you are going to use music that wasn't arranged specifically for the guitar, as in TAB format or fake book style, you are going to need to learn more about music. The piece he shows is normal sheet music style for vocal with piano accompaniment. If you look at choral music, it has 3 treble stave's, one for Soprano and Alto, one for Tenor and Bass and treble and bass stave's for the piano.
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#17 Deogee

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 10:54 PM

. If you look at choral music, it has 3 treble stave's, one for Soprano and Alto, one for Tenor and Bass and treble and bass stave's for the piano.




Interesting bit of info Glenn, I don't know that I've ever seen choral sheet music.

Don't let the frustration get to you Jack (kinda figured that was the case). It happens from time to time, & you know where you can come for help.(just come a little less frustrated, K? ) Posted Image

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOxaGcCcLt8


Hope this helps your project song along!! ( take it slow & easy at first ; can't go fast till you've gone sloooooowwww)
Lord, Help me to be the person my dog thinks I am




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