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#1 skatestarny2001

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 01:07 AM

I am a great enthusiast when it comes to hyperrealism or photorealism.
It is something I always wanted to do. I've gone to school in new york city but feel that my art education was incomplete.
I don't know how to mix colors correctly or use a color checker to measure intensity value and chroma and how the colors
relate to each other. When I saw that your course covered realism I got interested. but when I saw some of your still lifes
I was kind of disappointed. It didn't have that'photocopy' look to it. Does your course teach me to do the thing I want most
or am I wasting my money?

#2 Kent

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 05:41 AM

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#3 Gayle Levee

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 12:13 AM

This course will teach you how to mix colors, matching them to what you see in your photo reference. It also will teach you how to come up with your own idea, and then stage or find photographic reference to support your idea.

It will teach you the basic concepts of perspective and composition. The brushwork lessons will teach you how to get smooth gradations as well as other textures and edges. The lessons are simple and intended to convey an idea rather than to provide the be-all and end-all of your creative voice as an artist.

Earlier in my career, I used to do photorealism and photo-oriented concept paintings. More recently I have enjoyed painting from life, and have become convinced that painting from life is an invaluable part of learning how to be an artist. I encourage all artists to become proficient at this before turning to a heavy dependence on photographic reference.

#4 Highness

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 01:22 AM

Where's the "like" button??? :lovewarrior:
It takes a long time for a man to look like his portrait.
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#5 Amrit

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:06 PM

From the impression I get and from what you are describing is what is taught in the Carder Method. It seems to me Gayle's course is a different type of course from that of Mark Carder's teachings. Mark Carder is not teaching you how to be an artist, he is simply teaching you how to reproduce a still life accurately.

Gayle on the other hand (from what I've seen in the topic headlines) seems to cover different aspects of painting. I think in reality a mixture of both would be needed. If we are to become true artists then I don't think there is one course to cover everything. It seems to me that Gayle's course might work hand in hand as Mark Carder's method is very tedious and boring (something which he admits himself). I think Art is more than just about recreating a stll life, and Gayle gives the tools to apply various methods.

I haven't even bought the course Gayle, I'm just going from what I've seen from your students works posted in the forums.

Am I right Gayle?

email me on amritssandhu@gmail.com and I can share some links.

#6 MarinePainter

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 12:13 AM

The Carder Method may help produce a painting but it does not teach you to be an artist. I watched the intro video and it simplifies it to the point were you don't even need to learn color theory or learn how to draw. I admit that I am not a good drawer, but I do practice it and believe that drawing is helpful to understand perspective. I want to be a complete artist and I am willing to work hard to get there. If you are looking to produce a painting but never really understand what it is to be an "artist", the the Carder Method will do you just fine!

#7 brian91761

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 02:32 AM

The Carder Method may help produce a painting but it does not teach you to be an artist. I watched the intro video and it simplifies it to the point were you don't even need to learn color theory or learn how to draw. I admit that I am not a good drawer, but I do practice it and believe that drawing is helpful to understand perspective. I want to be a complete artist and I am willing to work hard to get there. If you are looking to produce a painting but never really understand what it is to be an "artist", the the Carder Method will do you just fine!


I agree completely. I checked out the Carder Method DVD before I bought Gayle's course. As far as I understand it the Carder Method teaches how to see values by using his "color checker". You must drape your studio in black fabric or paint the walls black and set up a black shadow box using a specific kind of fluorescent lighting; he recommends painting your easel and taboret black as well and wearing black while you paint, all to prevent reflected light from affecting the colors of the still life subject.

You work with a limited palette (primary colors + black and white)and use his slow drying medium to premix all of your colors in value gradations and store the basic colors in mason jars. He has a five-question system that you go through with each color that is similar to others I've come across that helps you determine hue, value, tone, etc. You draw your subject using a yellow pencil on a smooth, umber/white toned canvas using a pair of calipers to plot points that you connect to create an exact rendering. Then you painstakingly add in thin stripes of each color value changing your basic value paints to the proper hue, using the color checker for each. The paintings his students produce are close to photo realistic but the method would not be of much help for outdoor or landscape painting it seems to me, other than helping you "see" as an artist which is the point of the method.

Carder is a masterful painter of very realistic portraits. I'm sure that his course teaches one to see values and judge colors correctly but I don't think it comes close to teaching you all the things that Gayle does in her course. She teaches you everything about color theory, color mixing, composition, sight size, perspective, the Flemish method, alla prima, gesture drawing of figures and animals, and on and on. I'm very happy with my purchase and I'm confident that I am an artist in training. Someday I may check out the Carder Method if I feel I need more help with values but I can't drape my studio in black or paint the walls black so I couldn't do it right anyway.

#8 Amrit

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 08:49 AM

Totally agree with you Brian, however his paintings do look good and I would love to say I've done one once in my life.

Also if it helps, Carder doesn't necessarily say black, he says as long as it's a dark coloured wall on the wall behind the artist. The idea is to stop glare onto your canvas. So I'm thinking a chocolate brown wall could work in the room with magnolia walls.


Someday I may check out the Carder Method if I feel I need more help with values but I can't drape my studio in black or paint the walls black so I couldn't do it right anyway.



#9 MarthaT

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 03:25 PM

Welcome to the boards!
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#10 greenmatter

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 08:06 PM

Welcome aboard!
Don't Worry Be Happy!Posted Image:)

#11 Gayle Levee

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 12:01 AM

This is an interesting thread. One thing you all will notice as you work from life is that the colors of your walls and clothing DO affect what you see. When I paint outside I wear black because I don't want glare from my shirt affecting the color of the paint on the canvas.

Light bounces all over the place, and for the type of chiaroscuro used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, you will want to control it. For something more contemporary, you will want to learn to OBSERVE AND RECORD it.

But it is very important, no matter how you paint, to learn to SEE it!

#12 skatestarny2001

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 12:31 AM

Hi Gayle. About learning to see, how do you train yourself to see TRUE colors? when for example you encounter a photograph
with several variations, how do you learn to see those variations and translate them to your canvas? All my old teachers told
me was to squint and notice if and when the colors stand out or change. Are they right?

#13 Gayle Levee

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 12:37 AM

One thing to understand is that you will never see "true" colors looking at a photograph. Photographic inks use cmyk, k being black, and they use that black to show shadows. They also use an absence of ink to show light.

If you copy that, you will get a flat, chalky, boring painting. Even if you are trying for photorealism, that's what you will get unless you first learn how to see color from life.

Two lessons in this set will help you: the one about the apples, which shows you how to match a color, and the one about color theory.




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