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Stains on Maple Fretboard


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#1 savage8190

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 02:17 PM

I picked up a used guitar for quite a bargain but there are a couple black stains on the spalted maple fingerboard. When I bought it the strings were coated in finger gunk and the fret board was VERY dirty (so gross, I dont know how long he must have went without changing strings). Anyway, I cleaned it with a cleaner/polish a couple of times, and I scraped all the gunk out from the frets. It turned out very nice, but there is still two black spots where I guess the maple has been stained....Im guessing no, but is there any way to get the stains out?
"I only get concerned about money when the electricity goes out. Then you have to do acoustic records."

"...It`s not so much how good a player you are, it`s how cool you are".

- Slash

#2 Stargazer55

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 05:40 PM

I picked up a used guitar for quite a bargain but there are a couple black stains on the spalted maple fingerboard. When I bought it the strings were coated in finger gunk and the fret board was VERY dirty (so gross, I dont know how long he must have went without changing strings). Anyway, I cleaned it with a cleaner/polish a couple of times, and I scraped all the gunk out from the frets. It turned out very nice, but there is still two black spots where I guess the maple has been stained....Im guessing no, but is there any way to get the stains out?


Hey Savage,

Here's some info that I copied on the subject. It's basically for furniture but, wood is still wood regardless of its final shape.

Black Spots
Black spots are caused by water that has penetrated the finish completely and entered the wood. They cannot be removed without damage to the finish. If the spots are on a clearly defined surface, you may be able to remove the finish from this surface only; otherwise, the entire piece of furniture will have to be stripped. When the finish has been removed, bleach the entire stained surface with a solution of oxalic acid. Then refinish as necessary.

I know it's not the greatest news. Hope it helps.

Oops! I forgot this was Greg's column. Sorry Greg!

Tom
"Criticism is necessary and useful; it is often indispensable; but it can never take the place of action, or be even a poor substitute for it. The function of the mere critic is of very subordinate usefulness. It is the doer of deeds who actually counts in the battle for life, and not the man who looks on and says how the fight ought to be fought, without himself sharing the stress and the danger." Teddy Roosevelt(1894)

#3 savage8190

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 05:57 PM


I picked up a used guitar for quite a bargain but there are a couple black stains on the spalted maple fingerboard. When I bought it the strings were coated in finger gunk and the fret board was VERY dirty (so gross, I dont know how long he must have went without changing strings). Anyway, I cleaned it with a cleaner/polish a couple of times, and I scraped all the gunk out from the frets. It turned out very nice, but there is still two black spots where I guess the maple has been stained....Im guessing no, but is there any way to get the stains out?


Hey Savage,

Here's some info that I copied on the subject. It's basically for furniture but, wood is still wood regardless of its final shape.

Black Spots
Black spots are caused by water that has penetrated the finish completely and entered the wood. They cannot be removed without damage to the finish. If the spots are on a clearly defined surface, you may be able to remove the finish from this surface only; otherwise, the entire piece of furniture will have to be stripped. When the finish has been removed, bleach the entire stained surface with a solution of oxalic acid. Then refinish as necessary.

I know it's not the greatest news. Hope it helps.

Oops! I forgot this was Greg's column. Sorry Greg!

Tom


Thanks for the info Tom. Im not too worried about it, but if there was an easy fix Id do it. Really it seems to me that there was just so much gunk from the dudes hand on the strings maybe it rubbed into the wood where he tended to press hard and bend a lot. The strings were literally black and kind of chunky...and this was the guitar he played every day....so nasty.
"I only get concerned about money when the electricity goes out. Then you have to do acoustic records."

"...It`s not so much how good a player you are, it`s how cool you are".

- Slash

#4 Stargazer55

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 06:30 PM



I picked up a used guitar for quite a bargain but there are a couple black stains on the spalted maple fingerboard. When I bought it the strings were coated in finger gunk and the fret board was VERY dirty (so gross, I dont know how long he must have went without changing strings). Anyway, I cleaned it with a cleaner/polish a couple of times, and I scraped all the gunk out from the frets. It turned out very nice, but there is still two black spots where I guess the maple has been stained....Im guessing no, but is there any way to get the stains out?


Hey Savage,

Here's some info that I copied on the subject. It's basically for furniture but, wood is still wood regardless of its final shape.

Black Spots
Black spots are caused by water that has penetrated the finish completely and entered the wood. They cannot be removed without damage to the finish. If the spots are on a clearly defined surface, you may be able to remove the finish from this surface only; otherwise, the entire piece of furniture will have to be stripped. When the finish has been removed, bleach the entire stained surface with a solution of oxalic acid. Then refinish as necessary.

I know it's not the greatest news. Hope it helps.

Oops! I forgot this was Greg's column. Sorry Greg!

Tom


Thanks for the info Tom. Im not too worried about it, but if there was an easy fix Id do it. Really it seems to me that there was just so much gunk from the dudes hand on the strings maybe it rubbed into the wood where he tended to press hard and bend a lot. The strings were literally black and kind of chunky...and this was the guitar he played every day....so nasty.


I don't know how big the spots are but, if it wasn't a real valuable guitar, I might try to remove the lacquer over the spots and bleach the spots with a Q-tip & then put some new laquer back over the spots again with a Q-tip or small brush so that the new layer was higher than the old & then wet sand & steel wool it back down to the surface level of the rest of the fret board.

Tom
"Criticism is necessary and useful; it is often indispensable; but it can never take the place of action, or be even a poor substitute for it. The function of the mere critic is of very subordinate usefulness. It is the doer of deeds who actually counts in the battle for life, and not the man who looks on and says how the fight ought to be fought, without himself sharing the stress and the danger." Teddy Roosevelt(1894)

#5 Greg Voros

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 02:40 PM

Hey guys,

Have dirt in bare wood is really hard to remove. I try really hard to clean dark areas before I attempt any touch-up. i have tried bleach, peroxide, and a few others. Neither really works great,

Greg Voros




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